Garden vibe

20200424-Garden-vibe
Garden vibe (8″ x 8″ acrylic on raised wood panel)

These current times have me experimenting more with my art for some reason. Anyway, this is painted in acrylic which I haven’t done much with for a few years. It felt more playful and less “pressure-y” which was what I needed! And it turned out to be playful too – no surprises there! Acrylic dries so fast that if you decide a colour or shape isn’t working, you can paint over it almost right away. So different from both oils and watercolour.

Tom found inspiration for a very dynamic poem here! He adds some background information in case you’re wondering – like I did – what the heck that word means:
Thylakoids–which sound like they should be some kind of creature on
Edgar Rice Borough’s “Barsoom” (Mars)–are the structure within
chloroplasts where the light-dependent reactions that almost all life on
Earth ultimately depends on take place.

Storms of summer, raging light
crashing down as photic waves
sweep the beaches of the night
and shift dark beasts within their caves:
the sleeping thylakoids are roused
by the light in which they’re doused.
They ride the surges, open wide,
absorb the roaring solar tide
and feel some energy within
as bonds are broken and remade
within this bright and sunny glade,
a garden without sin
where simple surfaces abound
but deep beneath the truth is found.

image (c) 2020 Hilary Farmer
poem (c) 2020 TJ Radcliffe

 

further development of a painting…

the voyage - final detail sketch
the voyage – final detail sketch

This week I prepared my 18×24″ canvas with a variety of colours all in the mid tones in terms of darkness. I also sketched the position and clothing for the figure in the painting. The final result was refined during class today while producing this sketch to be used to transfer the most detailed part of the painting onto the canvas. For this I simply traced the sketch onto tracing paper, put graphite from my handy 6B pencil on the back and then transferred onto my canvas. It was still hard to see, so I followed up by applying some acrylic paint (raw umber) to follow the outline.

the voyage - outline added to colour-washed background
the voyage – outline added to colour-washed background

At this point some more adjustments were made with the teacher’s advice. The balance and composition were improved until we were both satisfied.

the voyage - tonal wash added
the voyage – tonal wash added

There was only enough time left to add some tone to the painting – also in a wash of raw umber acrylic paint. Since the light source will be from the far side of the hills, just adding the wash starts to give that feeling, starting to create ambiance and give an idea of the shape of the final painting. Even though this painting will be completed using oil paint, doing the painting to this point using acrylic was helpful as the detail won’t be smudged away when the oil paint is added next week.

Last time I posted poems that Tom had sent me for this work – here is another one, a haiku:

Clotho’s tangled thread
trails across the pier at dawn
she casts herself free

images (cc) 2013 Hilary Farmer
poetry (c) 2013 TJ Radcliffe

curious koi and haiku…

curious koi
curious koi

Another in the series from the last post. Tom’s haiku is clearer in this one since fewer layers were added after the text.

opening their eyes
curious koi might enquire
after the abyss

(c) 2013 TJ Radcliffe

It is hard to see this painting well in a photograph since the texture catches the light. Actually, the painting looks very different under different lighting conditions. The detail below was taken later in the day and shows another feeling… more abyss-like!

the abyss
the abyss

Playing with texture but using a similar palette with metallics to make a visual connection with the previous water lily painting.

image (cc) 2013 Hilary Farmer
12″x12″mixed media on panel

On another note, you will find a new link – twig and leaf – in my blog roll. Here’s a recent lovely post.

Have a great week!

yellow parrot tulips…a painting process

step 1 - background

I originally bought the tulips in March 2010. I was thinking at that time that if I left the canvas white where the tulips would be, that they would glow better and the yellow would be truer.

step 2

When I decided to actually develop this painting last weekend, I decided that I would be able to have a looser approach if the whole background was filled in and I wouldn’t have to worry about white canvas peaking through where I didn’t want it to.

step 3

Then I needed to actually start painting the tulips. Fortunately I had taken photos of the original tulips to work from. It developed quite quickly but didn’t yet have the contrast I wanted.

step 4

At this point I darkened up some areas and added some highlights to increase contrast. (Unfortunately, the photo doesn’t show this very clearly)

final step

Here I laid in some thick layers of paint to given some texture on the petals and leaves and finally the signature!

detail

A detail to show the texture. Since I have been finding it a bit of a challenge to stay loose when working on canvas (as opposed to paper) I am reasonably pleased with the results.

images (cc) 2011 Hilary Farmer