Sea of Roses

Sea of Roses (8″ x 10″ oil on canvas panel)

A perhaps even more whimsical variation on the sky flowers theme. Here the reflections of roses in the water are more like roses than the clouds are. I was trying to capture that colour in the sky when blue is just starting to fade into yellow without being really green! As with most of this series, there is a dream-like quality to the vision.

(C) 2022 Hilary Farmer

La Bee en Rose

La Bee en Rose (4″ x 4″ oil on raised panel)

The last in this series of mini paintings celebrating small creatures. Sorry (not sorry) about the title! I find the bilingual pun amusing. 😀

I love sweet fuzzy bumble bees and this one is definitely getting all the pollen from the rose that’s possible. It’s a bit hard to remember the warm sunny weather we were having when I painted this one with the November rain pounding down overhead …but looking at this small painting does bring back that summer feeling.

image (C) 2021 Hilary Farmer

June Blooms

June Blooms (8″ x 10″ oil on linen)

Fun with colour and flowers! Another view from a friend’s garden this summer. This one was painted in the studio from photo references rather than plein air though. I enjoyed getting into the textures and depths as well as letting the buds dissolve into the sky.

image (C) 2021 Hilary Farmer

Margaret’s Garden

Margaret’s Garden (8″x 10″ oil on raised panel)

Another lovely day in late June spent painting a garden. I was so pleased to be able to create this piece which ended up having quite a personal resonance for the owner.

Margaret’s Garden (Setup)

And here is the setup in the strong sunshine we had that day.

Have I mentioned how much I enjoy my plein air set up? It’s a Coulter Easel, and I have been using it for a couple of years now both for plein air and often (at least for smaller paintings) in the studio too. It is compact and very ergonomic with the palette and painting held at the perfect heights for working …and in cases like this with sloped ground, it is very easy to adjust a leg of the tripod to compensate for the terrain.

images (C) 2021 Hilary Farmer

Jane’s Garden May

Jane’s Garden May (8″ x 10″ oil on raised panel)

Back to plein air painting. I have a friend who lives quite close by and has a most delightful garden. I painted there three times this summer and each time it was a different kind of treat. In May, the peonies, roses and irises were showing all their bounty. So lush and joyful.

Jane’s Garden May plein air setup

images (c) 2021 Hilary Farmer

Wind. Flower.

Wind. Flower. (24″ x 36″ acrylic on canvas)
Wind. Flower. (Detail lower left corner)
Wind. Flower. (Detail upper left corner)
Wind. Flower. (Detail upper right)

I have been working on this painting (off and on) for months. I did post it once before but then after some time went by I decided to add even more layers. The overall photo doesn’t really show it well so I added some detail shots. I really do enjoy this process of building up and scraping away to reveal what’s underneath in places. It started out as a meditation on a friend’s garden I had visited and that is still there, but it dissolved and resolved into something else.

Tom wrote a deeply beautiful poem for this one.

Earth, water, air, and fire
combine, combust, conflate, conspire
to form the mystery of all things:
the solid ground, a ghost that sings
of other Edens lost to time
and futures flying in their prime
toward the secret, never seen.
They flit and flutter, twist and lean
to glimpse beyond this life’s abyss
and catch a moment’s endless bliss.

image (c) 2021 Hilary Farmer
poem (c) 2021 TJ Radcliffe

Wind Flower

Wind Flower (24″ x 36″ acrylic on canvas)

This painting started life as an abstract and some elements of that are still here. However, the piece really started to develop after a visit to a friend’s beautiful garden back towards the end of August. That’s when floral elements started to show themselves. I went back and forth on this one for about a month building up layers and thinking about it before I finally decided it was finished. The title comes from the anenomes that are on the right side which are sometimes called “windflower” and as well, the feeling of a breeze drifting through the petals of all the sunlit flowers.

Here is Tom’s lovely haiku which captures the scene so succinctly.

dawn over garden
summer world in soft dissolve
through the morning mist

image (c) 2020 Hilary Farmer
poem (c) 2020 TJ Radcliffe

White garden roses

White garden roses (8″ x 8″ oil on raised panel)

I do love flowers in their natural setting more than those in a vase. This is a study in white playing with the warm and cool tones to give a natural play of light and shadow on the petals.

Tom wrote a haiku for this one that captures the essence of the moment.

delicate scent wafts
petals open to the sun
summer afternoon

image (c) 2020 Hilary Farmer
poem (c) 2020 TJ Radcliffe